Friday, May 3, 2013

THE WINEMAKERS

My son and daughter-in-law, Jonas and Rachel Halpren, have a blog called "Drink of the Week."   Jonas has also written a book with Marcia Simmons called "DIY Cocktails," (available on Amazon).   My daughter-in-law is studying to be a  sommelier (wine steward and expert).  I can't drink alcohol without getting sick, and I don't particularly like the taste (even wine).  Jonas has no interest in transferware, although my daughter-in-law seems to like it (she is very polite about my passion).  So, when I mentioned that there is a transferware pattern that celebrates wine making,  Jonas and I saw this as a mother-son bonding moment!

The pattern below is known as "The Winemakers," but a  good case is made in the Friends of Blue Bulletin 134, p. 4 by Roger Pomfret that the name is actually "Wine Press."  He says "Wine Press" is the name of one of the engraved patterns mentioned in the sale advertisement of the John Benton Bagster factory (1823-1827).  The very unusual subject matter leaves little doubt that this is the "The Winemaker's" pattern and that the maker is Bagster.

The Winemakers or Wine Press Pattern 9.5 inches squarish, c. 1825

The Winemakers Close-up

The Winemakers Border

The classical scene on the vegetable tureen is as follows. A man stands inside a large wooden vat and accepts a basket of grapes from a classically dressed woman.  He is stomping on the grapes and the juice is coming out of a hole into a half barrel at the bottom of the vat.   Two more women carry baskets of grapes on their heads and a child carries a small basket in his arms.  Another man readies a large wooden mug to capture some juice.  A large grapevine climbs a tree in the center of the scene,  and the border is comprised of grape leaves, grapes and wheat.  The inner stringing (pattern that separates the central pattern from the border) resembles wine glasses (but that could be my overheated imagination).

Although this pattern is on a vegetable tureen, it also appears on a wine cooler (how appropriate!) as well as all of the items one would see in a dinner service (plates, platters, etc.).

This is one of my favorite patterns.  I hope Jonas and Rachel like it too!

DIY Cocktails and transferware look well together





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