Saturday, April 12, 2014

HAD GADYA AND GOATS ON TRANSFERWARE


Nineteenth century child's plate, Goat

As a child sitting at the Passover seder, I always looked forward to the song Had Gadya.  I knew Had Gadya was at the end of the seder,  and I was tired, full and ready to go to bed.  But the words of the song's cumulative rhyme (see my post on cumulative rhymes here) and the rousing music (hear Had Gadya sung by Cindy Michelassi), always energized me.  Still does. 
Here are two wonderful explanations of Chad Gadya: Kid Stuff
and From goat to God: Chad Gadya tells the story of the Jews.

Since this is a transferware blog, I shall show you some of my favorite goat patterns. 

Yellow glazed earthenware child's mug, ca 1820

Child's 4.75 inch plate with a molded Shamrock, Thistle and Rose border (symbols of Great Britain), ca. 1840

Edge, Malkin & Co. ( 1860-1870) 5 inch saucer in the Goat pattern

Stubbs & Kent (1822-1830) 5.75 inch saucer/Goat and Kid

My seder table/This year we will have 19 people and four generations at our seder.
CHAG SEMEACH!

2 comments:

  1. I know these prints, of course, but not the Jewish story. I appreciate the wisdom of this simple tale!

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  2. Had Gadya is an excellent way to involve children. Even my grown sons!

    ReplyDelete