Friday, February 28, 2014

SHELTERED PEASANTS AND SOURCE PRINTS


Shelter'd Peasants 10 inch plate by Ralph Hall, ca. 1825
Shelter'd Peasants mark
One of my many favorite patterns is Sheltered Peasants (or Shelter'd Peasants) by Ralph Hall (1822-1849).  (I always wonder why one letter is often replaced by an apostrophe in the 19th century, when it seems to be as much effort as writing the actual letter!)  The charming bucolic scene which includes a couple, a child and sheep is the same throughout the dinner service.  Like many of the early 19th century British patterns, the scene is copied from a source print.  My good friend, Dora, realized she owned it, so she gave it to me!  The engraver is Anthony Cardon (1772-1813) and the artist is Henry Singleton (1766-1839). 
The Shelter'd Peasants source print, 14 inches by 18 inches, ca. 1799
Imagine my surprise when I found a 19th century needlework at the show and sale of the Transferware Collectors Club's annual meeting in New Hampshire in 2010 with the Sheltered Peasants pattern!  It was beautifully worked in silk and wool on a silk scrim and was framed in bird's eye maple. Of course, I bought it.  
Shelter'd Peasants needlework, 18.5 inches by 16.5 inches



Friday, February 21, 2014

CUMULATIVE RHYMES ON CHILDREN'S POTTERY



A cumulative nursery rhyme or poem is when one rhyme builds on another.  It is an excellent teaching tool for children because memory and brain development are aided by numerous verses hooked together by rhymes and repetition.  The House That Jack Built and Who Killed Cock Robin are examples of cumulative rhymes, and both are found on pottery made for the 19th century child.  The House That Jack Built is featured on a series of mugs, each around 2.75 inches high, made by the Ynysmeudwy Pottery (1845-1877) in Wales.  (The bolded text indicates that it is featured on a mug).

This is the house that Jack built
This is the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built. 
This is the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

The History Of The House That Jack Built/ Notice that one side of the mug says The History, the center says Of The House plus a stanza of the rhyme, and the other side says That Jack Built.



This is the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.




This is the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.



This is the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.



This is the farmer sowing his corn,
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the maiden all forlorn,
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the dog,
That worried the cat,
That killed the rat,
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

Who Killed Cock Robin is found on a series of 3 inch high mugs which were possibly made by the Ynysmeudwy Pottery. The mugs are titled The Death of Cock Robin

Who killed Cock Robin?
I, said the Sparrow,
with my bow and arrow,
I killed Cock Robin.
The Death Of Cock Robin mug, 3 inches by 2.25 inches/ Notice that the first and last verses are found here

The first and last verses of The Death Of Cock Robin

Poor Cock Robin!/ if the photos look familiar, see my post titled  Robin Redbreast

Who saw him die?
I, said the Fly,
with my little eye,
I saw him die.
Who caught his blood?
I, said the Fish,
with my little dish,
I caught his blood.
Who saw him die and Who caught his blood/ I only had a photo of the center of this mug

Who'll make the shroud?
I, said the Beetle,
with my thread and needle,
I'll make the shroud.
Who'll dig his grave?
I, said the Owl,
with my pick and shovel,
I'll dig his grave.
Who'll be the parson?
I, said the Rook,
with my little book,
I'll be the parson.
Who'll be the clerk?
I, said the Lark,
if it's not in the dark,
I'll be the clerk.
Who'll carry the link?
Who'll carry him to the grave is also written Who'll carry the coffin/ Indeed, the Kite is carrying the coffin in the illustration! The mug is 3 inches by 2.75 inches.

Who'll carry him to the grave and Who will carry the link are both on this mug

The Linnet is carrying a link or torch

I, said the Linnet,
I'll fetch it in a minute,
I'll carry the link.
Who'll be chief mourner?
I, said the Dove,
I mourn for my love,
I'll be chief mourner.
Who'll carry the coffin?
I, said the Kite,
if it's not through the night,
I'll carry the coffin.
Who'll bear the pall?
We, said the Wren,
both the cock and the hen,
We'll bear the pall.
Who'll sing a psalm?
I, said the Thrush,
as she sat on a bush,
I'll sing a psalm.
Who'll toll the bell?
I said the Bull,
because I can pull,
I'll toll the bell.
All the birds of the air
fell a-sighing and a-sobbing,
when they heard the bell toll
for poor Cock Robin.

There must be other examples of cumulative rhymes printed on children's mugs and plates.  Perhaps you have seen something bearing images of There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed A Fly!  There are also cumulative tales such as The Gingerbread Man and The Gigantic Turnip, but so far I haven't found them on 19th century children's china.









Monday, February 17, 2014

KIDS READING TO CATS

My friend, Michael Grana, listed a charming plate on eBay.

Child's plate showing a girl reading to a cat, ca. 1840
On February 11, the Huffington Post featured an article titled Little Kids Read Books To Shelter Cats,... 
Child reading to a cat, 2014

A lovely connection between centuries!

Thursday, February 13, 2014

HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY 2014!

I mentioned in my Valentine's post for 2013 that although most small plates with molded borders were probably intended for children, some almost definitely were for adults.  I gave Kiss Me Quick to my husband for Valentine's Day last year.  It represented my own feelings for him more than a box of chocolates or a card!
Kiss Me Quick 4.74 inch child's plate, ca. 1840/Notice that the cartouche doesn't quite fit in the center of the plate

Monday, February 10, 2014

CUPIDS FOR VALENTINE'S DAY

One of my favorite patterns shows two entwined fairies or cupids flying toward roses.  It was made by William Adams III (1804-1829) in dark blue for the American Market. 
Adams, Two Cupids Flying or Cupids and Roses 10 inch plate, ca. 1825
While visiting my friend, Dora, I noticed she owned more patterns from what now appeared to be plates from a series.  I wondered if they were part of a dinner service,  but so far only plates have been found; no platters or serving pieces.

Adams, Cupid and Venus Holding A Garland 8.75 inch plate, ca. 1825

Adams, Cupid and Venus with Lyre 7.75 inch plate, ca. 1825

Adams, Cupid Surprising a Woman or, perhaps, Psyche Surprising Cupid 7 inch plate, ca. 1825
A few years ago, Sara Avins-Gagnon wrote an excellent article for the Transferware Collectors Club Bulletin titled Falling In Love With The Cupid Series.  She suggested that the inspiration for the patterns is the 1805 poem by Mary Tighe (1772-1810) titled Psyche, or the Legend Of Love.  It tells the story of the love of Cupid and Psyche (like most myths, there are many trials).  Take a look at the poem.  Lovely reading for Valentine's Day!  But not as lovely (to me) as the plates.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

YEAR OF THE HORSE


Toy Plate, 2 inches, ca. 1835
The celebration of the Chinese Lunar year is five thousand years old.  There are twelve animals in the Chinese calendar;  a different one for each year of a twelve year cycle.   The beginning of the Chinese New Year always falls between January 21 and February 21.  This year, it began on January 31.  It is  the Year Of The Horse.

I thought I would show you some of my favorite patterns with horses that resemble a Chinese horse. All are found in the Transferware Collectors Club Pattern and Source Print Database.

Child's 2.25 inch high mug, ca 1835

William Adams & Co. (1896-1917) 8.12 inch child's plate

The English pearlware plate below is based on a Chinese porcelain original.
An 8 inch pearlware soup dish in the Galloping Horse Variation #01


Chinese porcelain platter from the Chinse K'ang His (Kangxi) period (1662-1722) from which the Galloping Horse pattern was copied

Modern Chinese horses!  Gung Hay Fat Choy!





Take a look at what I wrote last year about Chinese New Year.