Tuesday, April 14, 2015

"GONE WITH THE WIND" AND BLUE TRANSFERWARE





John & Richard Riley (1802-1828) 13.25 inch washbowl and 10.75 inch high (to the top of the handle) wash jug.  The pattern is known as "Feeding Chickens."
 
I watched "Gone With The Wind" last night on PBS.  I read the book in the summer of 1958, when I turned 14, and saw the movie the same year.  I loved it.  I have seen the movie five times since then.  Last night, I wasn't so enthralled by the movie.  Scarlett seemed pig-headed and shrewish, and Rhett was way too old for her.  I really felt Rhett did the wrong thing when he deserted Scarlett, Prissy, Melanie and her newborn baby to join the Rebel army.  What seemed romantic when I was young,  just looked negligent and self indulgent to me now.  However, I digress.  I saw something in the movie that I hadn't see before.  In the scene where Melanie is having her baby, Scarlett picks up a circa 1820s blue transferware wash pitcher to get some water.  She lifts it out of a large washbowl. The pitcher and bowl get about three minutes of time in the three hour movie, but I was riveted to them.   I wish I could identify the pattern.  Oh well.  I will have to show you my pitcher and bowl instead.


John & Richard Riley (1802-1828) 13.25 inch washbowl and 10.75 inch high (to the top of the handle) wash jug.  The pattern is known as "Feeding Chickens."/Notice the outside of the bowl is printed with the border pattern.

Next time you watch the movie, keep your eyes open for the pitcher and bowl, and let me know the pattern!

1 comment:

  1. How interesting, I'll have to watch the film again.

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