Monday, August 14, 2017

A PRESENT FROM MY AUNT


"For My Niece" 2 inch mug by an unknown maker, ca. 1830

Children's plates and mugs from family members were common gifts in the 19th century.  Mainly, the transferware patterns were intended as gifts from mothers, fathers, grandparents, brothers, and sisters.  Less common were patterns from an aunt.  Here are a few.

"A Trifle for my Dear Niece" child's plate with a molded daisy border, ca. 1840


"For My Little Niece" child's mug, ca. 1820


"A Present From My Aunt" child's plate, ca. 1830


"For my Neice (sic)" 4.2 inch plate with a shell edge, ca. 1820. 

My Aunt Sylvia died yesterday.  She was 96.  For my entire life, she was someone who loved me unconditionally.  I will add that it easier, as her daughter Judy once said, "to be a niece!"

I was the baby born during World War ll that my aunt doted on (her husband, my uncle Herm, was in the Pacific and my father, her brother, was in Italy). I'll add that there were no other babies in the family in 1944.  I went to visit her every school vacation from the time I was ten. (I took the train from Philadelphia to Harrisburg on my own.)  I always knew I could tell her everything.  I asked her about clothes, books, and boyfriends when I was young.  I shared my successes and disappointments when I was older.  Aunt Syl always had comforting words and advice.  Her wisdom, intelligence, and kindness sustained me through my most difficult times.  I can't think of a better gift than the love of my Aunt Sylvia.

Rest in Peace Aunt Syl  (December 31, 1920-August 11, 2017).

L to R: Me, Aunt Sylvia's daughters, Debbie and Judy, and Aunt Syl

David, Judie and Aunt Sylvia at her grandson's wedding in 2012.

David and Aunt Syl's great great grandnephew Alex (our grandson) in July 2017. I took the photo.
 
One more thing.  I wondered if there were any patterns that were intended as gifts from an uncle.  There was only one in the Transferware Collectors Club Database of Patterns And Sources.

"A Present from my Uncle" 4.5 inch plate, ca. 1830.